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QAI Level 7 Advance Diploma in Business Management (BUSL701)

Introduction

This qualification is mapped to the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF).

The qualification title is as they will appear on learner’s certificate. Learners must be informed about this when they register for the programme. The learner will achieve the above qualification certificate, upon successful completion of the full programme. The centre must also make a copy of this specification available to the learners.

This specification contains the details of all courses that constitute the full qualification and its associated guidance. Each course sets out the required Learning Outcomes (LO), Evaluation Criteria, Content, Assessment method, Recommended reading, Study resources and other important information as may be helpful to the centres delivering the qualification.

Qualification Highlights

This qualification is developed to provide work related vocational programme, mapped to the QCF to ensure a standardised programme structure.

The programme offers a strong, industry linked emphasis on practical skills development while keeping into consideration the development of required knowledge, understanding and skills.

The qualifications provide a solid base in the key concepts and practical skills required in the industry and allows for direct progression to a full MBA degree from Cardiff Metropolitan University and employment.

The progression path for this qualification is:

  • MBA (General), of Cardiff Metropolitan University, Wales, UK
  • Other qualifications / master’s programme with a University, subject to the acceptance by the receiving institution(s) in which the learner seeks admission.
  • This qualification is developed with a focus on providing:
  • Subject knowledge and practical skills required for career in the area of Business and Management studies.
  • A qualification that allows flexibility of learning.
  • An option that meets the requirements for higher level specialisation and employability in the field of business and management.
  • An opportunity for learners to focus on the building higher-level skills in the field of Business and Management and for high performance and achievement in professional and work life.
  • An opportunity for the learners to progress to higher education programmes in the field of Business and Management.

The QAI Level 7 Advance Diploma in Business Management (BUSL701) is made up of 6 mandatory modules and 1 optional module totalling to a 120 credit programme. The mention of Guided Learning Hours (GLH) herein is a notional reference to the amount of learning that a learner is expected to put for each unit and includes Face-to-face interaction, Seminars, Workshops, Assignments, Self-study, Project work, Group work and final assessment.

Course Code Core & Optional Modules Level Credit GLH
Value
L7 BUSL70101 People and Organisations (Core module) 7 20 200
L7 BUSL70102 Accounting for Decision Makers (Core module) 7 20 200
L7 BUSL70103 Strategic Management (Core module) 7 20 200
L7 BUSL70104 Marketing (Core module) 7 20 200
L7 BUSL70107 Operations Management (Core module) 7 20 200
L7 BUSL70108 Project Management Theory and Practice (Optional 7 20 200
module)
L7 BUSL70109 Managing the Product Development Process (Optional 7 20 200
module)

Enrolment and Equal Opportunity

The policy regarding enrolment is that of providing:

  • Opportunity to anyone who is capable of meeting the learning outcomes
  • Barrier fee access to the programme and learning
  • Equal opportunity to all who wish to enrol and are able to meet the assessment requirements

It is important the enrolment is done using a transparent and well-defined process. Centre must ensure that complete information relating to the programme is available to all prospective learner and that they are being given any additional details required for them to understand that the programme will meet their objective.

It is strongly advised that all centres consider the minimum professional qualification and age of a learner before enrolling them for the programme. For this qualification the entry criteria as recommended by QAI is:

  • A minimum of 21 years of age
  • An undergraduate degree with at least 50% overall marks from a recognised University OR equivalent recognised qualification with 50% average marks.
  • English Language proficiency at Level B2 on the CEFR using any UKBA approved exams such as IELTS, Cambridge English: Advanced (CAE), Cambridge English: Business Certificate (BEC-V). In case a student is unable to provide evidence of Level B2, the candidate will be required to undergo a mandatory English Language programme alongside the Diploma programme and will need to demonstrate English Language Proficiency at Level B2.

Candidates who do not possess normal minimum entry qualification may be considered for exceptions & exemption on a case-by-case basis. The process may include an entry test (generic aptitude), face-to-face interview, and consideration towards and practical work experience using the accreditation of prior learning (APL) as set out by QAI, UK.

The centre must follow the QAI’s policy on access arrangements and special considerations to enhance access to the qualifications for learners with disabilities and other difficulties (as defined by the disability Discrimination Act 1995 and the amendments to the Act) without compromising the quality of programme delivery and assessment. The centres are advised to get in touch with the respective regional centres to get more information on access arrangements.

Qualification Format

Each course uses a standard format to provide clear guideline on the programme, learning outcomes, evaluation requirements, evaluation methods, resources and reference material & suggested activity to support learning

These are classified as under:

  • Programme course title: The name of the course with its code number
  • Recommended Guided Learning Hours (GLH): The notional reference to the amount of learning that a learner is expected to put for each unit and includes Face-to-face interaction, Seminars, Workshops, Assignments, Self-study, Project work, Group work and final assessment.
  • Course Summary: A brief description of the basic purpose of the course, along with the main areas of study.
  • Learning outcomes (Summary): The list of learning outcomes that are expected to be achieved upon completion of the unit.
  • Learning outcomes (expanded): Each learning outcome will further expand to list; Assessment requirement and Content
  • Suggested activity & Reading: Some helpful information regarding support material and links / websites that can be used by the learner to assist in their learning process
  • Outcomes and evaluation criteria: Each unit contains statements, which will evaluate the evidence that each learner should produce in order to receive a Pass, Merit or Distinction in each unit.

People and Organisations

Unit Title: People and Organisations        Unit Code: BUSL70101                    Level: 7

Credit Value: 20                   Guided Learning Hours: 200           Module Type: Compulsory

Objective

The purpose of this module is to allow students to develop a critical insight into the factors that influence the behaviour of people within organisations and how such behaviour contributes to organisational effectiveness. It also aims to provide a critical appreciation of the diversity of HRM issues and the primary role and key functions of HR with reference to relevant theoretical models and concepts of HRM.

Particular attention will be paid to organisation structure, culture, conflict and the management of change and will engage in an exploration the role of the human resource manager and their associated tasks in this broad organisational context.

It also examines the relationships beyond the organisation and wider environmental and economic factors that can affect the development of an enterprise.

The module also aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop effective planning, analytical and problem solving skills.

Learning Outcome

At the end of this module, students should be able to:

  1. Critically analyse key theoretical approaches to the management of change with reference to structure, culture, conflict and managing self
  2.  Critically examine organisational behaviour in a variety of contexts and develop discussion based on complex scenarios and the changing external environment
  3.  Develop, explore and critique human resource management approaches in these contexts with reference to contemporary theory and an understanding of current practice
  4.  A conceptual understanding of the core theories in understanding people and their role in organisations

Programme Indicative Content

The module is structured into three distinct and equally weighted sections as outlined below;

  • Reflective Practice– examining theories of learning and reflective practice, professional practice, management and reflection.
  • Organisational Behaviour – examining theories of organisational practice, including organisational structure, culture and power and politics.
  • Human Resource Management– examining key concepts of strategic HRM, with application to a contemporary case study.

Evaluation Criteria

Assessment Method Duration / Type Weightage
Case Studies 3000 words 50%
Written examination 2 hours 50%

Core Textbook

  • Prasad, L. M (2008) Organisational Behaviour (5th) New Delhi : Sultan Chand & Sons
  • Linstead S, Fulop, L and Lilley S (2009) Management and Organisation, London: Palgrave Hall

Recommended Reading

  • Robbins, Stephen P., et al. (2009) Management (10th) Pearson
  • Stephen P Robbins, Mary Coulter and Neharika Vohra (2009) Organisational Behaviour (10th) Pearson Education
  • Tapomoy Deb (2008) Performance Appraisal and Management (1st) Excel Books
  • Gary Dessler (2008) Human Resource Management (11th) Pearson Education
  • Mullins LJ (2006), Management & Organisational Behaviour, Financial Times/Prentice Hall
  • Kew J & Stedwick J (2005), Business Environment: Managing in a Strategic Context, CIPD
  • Kew, J., & Stedwick, J., (2010), Human Resource Management in a Business Context, CIPD
  • Beardwell L & Claydon T (2007), HRM: a contemporary perspective (5th) FT/Prentice Hall
  • Beardwell L & Claydon T (2007), HRM: a contemporary perspective (6th) FT/Prentice Hall
  • Cole G (2006), Personnel & HRM (9th) Continuum
  • Armstrong M (2006), Strategic HRM: a guide to action (23rd) Kogan Page
  • Blyton P & Turnbull P (2006), The Dynamics of Employee Relations (5th) Palgrave
  • Legge K, (2005), HRM: Rhetorics & Realities, Palgrave
  • Hughes M, (2006), Change Management, CIPD
  • Robinson I, (2006), HRM in Organisations, CIPD
  • Houldsworth E & Jirasinghe D, (2006), Managing & Measuring Employee Performance, Kogan Page
  • Greene AM & Kirton G (2005), The Dynamics of Managing Diversity (2nd), Elsevier
  • Wilson JP (Ed) (2006), Human resource Development (2nd), Kogan Page
  • Cottrell, S., (2010), Skills for Success, The Personal Development Planning Handbook (2nd), Palgrave
  • Morgan, G., (2006), Images of Organization,(updated edition), Sage
  • Robbins, S.P., and Judge, T. A.,(2012), Organisational Behaviour, Global Edition (15th), Pearson

Journals

  • International Journal of Human Resource Management
  • Human Resource Management Journal
  • Humane Resource Management Review
  • Employment Relations
  • People Management (CIPD)

Recommended MOOCs and OERs

Accounting for Decision Makers

Unit Title: Accounting for Decision Makers          Unit Code: BUS70102                      Level:  7

Credit Value: 20                   Guided Learning Hours: 200           Module Type: Compulsory

Objective

This module is designed to provide future managers with a level of practical understanding that is genuinely useful in the workplace by covering a range of key financial and management accounting areas including: how to interpret financial statements; understanding cost classification and behaviour in short-term decision making and the principles of budgeting and budgetary control.

Learning Outcome

After completion of the module, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of, and evaluate, balance sheets and income statements
  2. Interpret the financial data commonly provided by accountants to managers
  3. Evaluate and solve different practical problems using marginal costing and breakeven analysis
  4. Interpret cash budgets as part of budgetary control

Programme Indicative Content

Introduction to Accounting

  • Nature and roles of accounting, Users of financial information and their needs, Distinction between financial and management accounting;

Financial Statements

  • Prepare a simple balance sheet and income statement; Discuss accounting conventions underpinning the financial statements; Discuss uses and limitations of the financial statements. 14 Specification: BUSL701/07/2015 (V1.2)

Ratio Analysis

  • Calculation of key ratios for assessing the profitability, efficiency, liquidity and gearing of a business; explain the significance of the ratios calculated; Discuss the limitations of ratios as a tool of financial analysis.

Working Capital

  • Managing Inventories, Receivables, Payables and the Operating Cash Cycle.

Cost-Volume-Profit analysis

  • Distinction between fixed and variable costs – their classification and behaviour; Using break-even analysis to evaluate business opportunities; Using marginal costing for decision making on maximising returns;

Budgeting

  • Explain the budgeting process and the interlinking of the various budgets within the business; Construct various budgets, including the cash budget from relevant data; Understand why profit is not the same as cash flow.

Evaluation Criteria

Assessment Method Duration / Type Weightage
Coursework 3000 words 50%
Exam 2 hours 50%

Core Textbook

  • I M Pandey, Financial Management (10th) Vikas Publication
  • Atrill, P., & McLaney, E.,(2012) Accounting and Finance for Non-Specialists (with My Accounting Lab), (8th), Financial Times / Prentice Hall

Recommended Reading

  • Davies T & Pain B (2006), Business Accounting and Finance, McGraw Hill
  • Davies, T., & Crawford, I., (2011), Business Accounting and Finance (1st), Financial Times / Prentice Hall
  • McLaney E & Atrill P (2007), Accounting: An Introduction, Financial Times/Prentice Hill
  • Pike R & Neal B (2005), Corporate Finance and Investment, Financial Times/Prentice Hill
  • Bodie & Merton (2005), Finance, Financial Times/Prentice Hill
  • McClaney, E. (2006), Corporate Finance Theory & Practice, Financial Times/Prentice Hill
  • Mary Cary, Cathy Knowles & Jane Towers Clark, Accounting –A Smart Approach, Oxford University Press
  • C. Hull, Risk Management and Financial Institution, Pearson Education
  • Banerjee, Cost Accounting, PHI Learning Private Ltd.
  • John C. Hull, Options, Futures and Other Derivatives, Pearson Publications
  • Rajeev Srivastava, Derivatives, Oxford University Press
  • Kirk Patrick and Dahlquist, Technical Analysis: The Complete Resource for Financial Market Technicians, FT Press
  • Mukherjee and M. Hanif, Modern Accountancy – Volume I, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Company
  • Prasanna Chandra, Project Management, Tata McGraw Hill
  • Davies T & Pain B (2006), Business Accounting and Finance, McGraw Hill
  • McLaney E & Atrill P (2007), Accounting: An Introduction, Financial Times/Prentice Hill
  • Pike R & Neal B( 2005), Corporate Finance and Investment, Financial Times/Prentice Hill
  • McLaney, E., & Atrill, P., (2012), Accounting: An Introduction (with My Accounting Lab) (6th), Financial Times, Prentice Hall
  • Weetman, P.,(2013), Financial and Management Accounting: An Introduction (with My Accounting Lab) (6th), Financial Times / Prentice Hall

Recommended MOOCs and OERs

 

Strategic Management

Unit Title: Strategic Management             Unit Code: BUSL70103                    Level: 7

 

Credit Value: 20                   Guided Learning Hours: 200           Module Type: Compulsory

 

Objective

 

Strategic management today is a key concern for decision-makers in all types and size of organisations within private or public sector. Questions of how firms compete and how they sustain competitive advantage are key issues for the long-term future of organisations. The module will explore and provide insights into the factors influencing the formulation and implementation of strategy. As social and ecological concerns move to the fore front of strategic issues facing organisations the module also aims to facilitate the understanding of issues arising out of the process of internationalisation corporate values and social responsibility. Finally, module aims is to enhance students’ understanding of strategy, developing the ability to examine and evaluate strategic decisions via multiple perspectives.

 

Learning Outcome

At the end of this module students should be able to:

  1. Evaluate and reflect on the influences driving demand within the business to consumer and business to business markets and the factors influencing the strength of their influence
  2. Critically assess the debates that surround corporate values and social responsibilities.
  3. Analyse competition and customer requirements in order to identify opportunities for competitive advantage within an industry.
  4. Identify different types of strategic change programmes and assess the value of different leadership styles in managing strategic change.

 

Programme Indicative Content

  • The Environment
  • Strategic Capabilities
  • Integrating Internal & External Environment
  • The Nature and Sources of Competitive Advantage
  • Strategic Purpose
  • Culture & Strategy
  • Business Strategy / Business Level Strategy
  • Corporate Strategy and Diversification
  • International Strategy
  •  Leadership & Strategic Change

Evaluation Criteria

Assessment Method Duration / Type Weightage
Coursework 3000 words 50%
Examination 2 hours 50%

Core Textbook

  • Clegg, S. Kornberger, M and Pitsis, T (2005) Managing and Organizations London: Sage
  • Johnson, G. Scholes, K. and Whittington, R. (2005) Exploring Corporate Strategy: Text and Cases London: Prentice Hall
  • Besanko, D., Dranove, D. and Shanley, M. (2004) The Economics of Strategy New York: John Wiley
  • Henk, W., Volbarda et al. (2011), Strategic Management (9th), South – Western, Cengage Learning
  • Johnson, G., Scholes, K., & Whittington, R., (2011), Exploring Strategy (9th), FT: Prentice Hall

Recommended Reading

  • Palmer, I. and Hardy, C. (2000) Thinking about management London: Sage
  • Porter, M. (1985) Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior Performance New York: Free Press
  • Pettigrew, Thomas and Whittington (2002) Handbook of Strategy and Management London: Sage
  • Mintzberg et al (2005) Strategic Safari-A guided Tour through the Wilds of Strategic Management New York: Free Press
  • Haslam, G., Anderson, T.,Tsitsianis, N., & Yin, Y.P., (2012), Redefining Business Models Strategies for a Financialized World, Routledge; Oxon Hill
  • L., & Jones, G.R., (2007), Strategic Management: An Integrated Approach, Houghton Mifflin.
  • McGee, J., Thomas, H., & Wilson, D., (2005), Strategy, Analysis & Practice,McGraw Hill.
  • McElroy, M.W., & Van Engelen, J.M.L., (2011), Corporate Sustainability Management the Art and Science of Managing Non-Financial Performance, Routledge; Oxon
  • Woods, M., (2011), Risk management in Organisations: An Integrated Case Study Approach, Routledge; Oxon

Recommended Journals

  • Journal of Management Studies
  • Journal of Business Strategy
  • Long Range Planning
  • Sloan Management Review
  • Strategic Change
  • Strategic Management Journal
  • Technology Analysis and Strategic Management

Recommended MOOCs and OERs

Unit Title: Marketing           Unit Code: BUSL70104                                Level: 7

Credit Value: 20                   Guided Learning Hours: 200           Module Type: Compulsory

Objective

The aim of the module is to provide students with a practical understanding of how the dynamics of the market, the business environment, customer trends and behaviour and the organisation’s own capabilities impact upon its ability to develop and deliver profitable customer propositions.

An emphasis will be placed on the application of key theories, concepts and techniques to develop an in-depth understanding of a market and to develop appropriate marketing strategies and plans.

Learning Outcome

At the end of this module, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role and function of marketing in a variety or market and organisational contexts.
  2.  Critically evaluate and utilise marketing research data and methods to a given marketing situation.
  3.  Apply and evaluate the principles of organisational and environmental audits to inform marketing strategies, decisions and objectives.
  4.  Develop and justify a marketing plan and mix for a given target market.

Programme Indicative Content

  • The marketing concept: theories and concepts, planning, organisational context (B2C/B2B/NfP)
  • Dynamics of the marketplace: supply/demand, types of market, competitiveness
  • Consumer behaviour: purchasing models/factors, decision making unit, purchasing
  • Market segmentation/STP: methods of segmentation, targeting strategies, positioning
  • Marketing research techniques: primary/secondary, quantitative/qualitative
  • Analysing of research data to inform marketing strategies and plans
  • Internal audits: organisational/marketing capabilities- strengths/weaknesses
  • Environmental audits: micro/macro/global, market opportunities/threats
  • Developing marketing strategy: SWOT/TOWS analysis
  • Strategic decisions: market selection, positioning, competitive stance, growth
  • Operationalising the marketing mix for a target segment (4P/4C/7P)
  • Product: categories, goods/services, lifecycle, USP/FAB, portfolio, new product development
  • Price: role of price, break-even/contribution, strategic/tactical pricing strategies,
  • Place: role of distribution, channels, emergence of retail/e-tail channels, logistics
  • Promotions: aims of promotion, promotional mix, push/pull/profile, IMC
  • 7Ps: goods vs services, physical evidence, people, processes

Evaluation Criteria

Assessment Method Duration / Type Weightage
Coursework 3000 words 50%
Written Exam 2 hours 50%

Core Textbook

  • Blythe, J. (2009), Principles and Practice of Marketing, Thomson ( Biz-Ed)
  • Doole, I. and Lowe, R. (2008) Strategic Marketing Decisions. Thompson. London (Biz-Ed)
  • Wilson M S, Gilligan C, (2005), Strategic Marketing Management, CIM/Elsevier (e-book)
  • Kent, R (2008) Marketing Research: Approaches, Methods and Applications 1e ( Biz-Ed)
  • Wilson A (2006) Marketing Research: an integrated approach 2e, Pearson, Harlow (e-book)
  • Armstrong, G., Kotler, P., Harker, M., Brennan, R., (2012), Marketing: An Introduction (2nd), Pearson
  • Hooley, G., Piercy, N.F., Nicolaud, B., (2012), Marketing Strategy & Competitive Positioning (5th), FT Prentice Hall
  • Lee, K., & Carter, S., (2012), Global Marketing Management, Oxford
  • McDaniel, C. J.r., Gates, R., (2012), Marketing Research (9th International Student Version), Wiley

Recommended Reading

  • Blythe, J. (2009), Key Concepts in Marketing, Sage Publications, London
  • Brassington and Pettitt (2007) Principles of Marketing (4th), FT Prentice Hall
  • Kotler, P. (2006), Marketing Management (12th), FT Prentice Hall
  • McDaniel and Gates. (2007), Market Research (7th), Wiley
  • Aaker, D., (2010), Strategic Marketing Management: Global Perspectives, Wiley
  • Aaker, D., (2010), Marketing Research, 10th Ed International Student Version, Wiley
  • Blythe, J., (2012), Essentials of Marketing, Pearson
  • Bradley, N., (2010), Marketing Research: tools & techniques, Oxford University Press
  • Chaffey, D., Ellis-Chadwick, F.,(2012), Digital Marketing: Strategy, Implementation & Practice, 5/E, Pearson
  • DePelsemaker, P., Kenhove, P., Janssens, W., Wijnen, K., (2008), Marketing research with SPSS, FT Prentice Hall
  • Doole, I., Lowe, R., (2012), International Marketing Strategy, Cengage Learning, Keegan
  • Hollensen, S., (2012), Essentials of Global Marketing, 2/E, Pearson
  • Lamb, C.W., Hair, J.F., McDaniel, C., (2012), Essentials of Marketing, Cengage Learning
  • McDonald, M., (2011), Marketing Plans- How To Prepare Them, How To Use Them, Wiley
  • Solomon, M., (2012), Consumer Behavior: Global Edition, 10/E, Pearson
  • Wilson, M.S., Gilligan, C., (2005), Strategic Marketing Management, CIM/Elsevier (e-book)
  • Wood, M.B., (2010), Essential Guide to Marketing Planning, FT Prentice Hall

Journals: all available as e-journals via the LRC

  • Marketing (e-jnl & print)
  • Journal of Consumer Research (e-jnl to –1yr)
  • European Journal of Marketing (e-jnl & print)
  • Journal of Marketing Research ((e-jnl)
  • Irish Marketing Review (e-jnl)
  • Marketing Management Journal (e-jnl)
  • Journal of Consumer Behaviour (e-jnl to –1yr)
  • Journal of Strategic Mktg (e-jnl to –1 yr)
  • Journal of Marketing (e-jnl & print)
  • Journal of International Marketing

Other Sources:

Recommended MOOCs and OERs

 

Operations Management

Unit Title: Operations Management                     Unit Code: BUSL70107        Level: 7

Credit Value: 20                   Guided Learning Hours: 200           Module Type: Compulsory

Objective

This module aims to develop and introduce and develop a critical understanding operations management for modern organisations in a variety of sectors of activity. It considers operations strategy in its broadest sense and then relates this to the internal management and organisation of the production of goods and services within organisations in different sectors of the economy. It examines how to organise resources and operations, and how to improve them using a variety of quality tools and techniques and process improvement activities. The module also considers the organisation in its wider context; examining how inputs on the supply side can be managed and improved, and on the demand side how customers, and customer satisfaction can be understood.

Learning Outcome

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the nature, scope and extent of manufacturing and service operations strategy
  2. Critically evaluate the use of quality tools and techniques for a wide range of organisational problems
  3. Solve complex operational problems related to managing capacity and constraints within organisations
  4. Critically evaluate the application of strategies, tools and techniques to improve business operations
  5. Critically appraise and select appropriate methods for managing supply bases for a variety of organizations

Programme Indicative Content

The content of this module will focus primarily on the future needs of students and can be tailored to their likely subsequent careers. For those students likely to be entering the service sector the module can primarily be focused on service operations management with manufacturing operations management being taught as the minor component. For those students with a likely career in manufacturing, then manufacturing operations can be the major focus with service operations management taught as the minor component.

  • Operations strategy
  • Customer service
  • Managing capacity and demand
  • Scheduling operations
  • Waiting, queuing theory and practice
  • Managing inventory
  • Quality management tools and techniques
  • Process analysis and improvement
  •  New product and service development
  •  Purchasing and supplier management

Evaluation Criteria

Assessment Method Duration / Type Weightage
Coursework 3,000 words 50%
Written Exam 2 hours 50%

Core Textbook

  • Johnson, R., and Clark, G., (2012), Service operations management: improving service delivery, FT Prentice Hall; London
  • Hill, A., and Hill, T., (2012), Operations management, Palgrave Macmillan; Basingstoke

Recommended Reading

  • Cousins, P., Lamming, R., Lawson, B., and Squire, B., (2008), Strategic Supply Management: Principles, Theories and Practice, Prentice Hall; London.
  •  Hollins, W., and Shinkins, S., (2006), Managing Service Operations: Design and Implementation, Sage Publications; London.
  •  Fitzsimmons, J., and Fitzsimmons, M., (2010), Service Management: operations, strategy and information technology, McGraw-Hill Higher Education; Boston MA.
  •  Slack, N., Brandon-James, A., and Johnston, R., (2013), Operations Management, Pearson; London

Recommended MOOCs and OERs

Project Management Theory and Practice

Unit Title: Project Management Theory and Practice                Unit Code: BUSL70108

 

Level: 7                                  Credit Value: 20                                Guided Learning Hour: 200

 

Module Type: Optional

 

Objectives

 

This module is designed to provide the student with a good theoretical and practical knowledge of Project Management and its place within the wider field of management.

 

Learning Outcome

 

After completing this module the student should be able to:

 

  1. Apply the key principles, tools and techniques as detailed within the Project Management Institute Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMI PMBOK) to a range of project management contexts.
  2.  Critically evaluate the differences between and applications of the main project management methodologies in use today.
  3.  Synthesise learning – key concepts, theories and techniques – from other MBA (particularly core) modules and apply to project management methodological contexts and practices. This would be draw from a broad range of Management Theory (see indicative content below)
  4.  Reflect critically upon practice and adapt that practice to a variety of contexts and challenges

Programme Indicative Content

Project Management Methodologies principally (but not exclusively) PMI PMBOK, PRINCE2, Agile, SCRUM, Waterfall Approach

Foundation principles of projects, programmes and portfolios; project and organisational structures, the role of the Project Manager and the structure and role of the Project Management Office (PMO)

Principles and practice for the management of project scope, time, costs, integration, communication, human resources, procurement, risk and quality

A broad range of management theory. Examples would include Communications Theory, Team Theory, Complexity Theory, Motivation Theory, Financial Forecasting and Estimation, and Principles of Leadership

Project Management case studies

Evaluation Criteria

Assessment Method Duration / Type Weightage
Coursework 3000 words 50%
Written Exam 2 hours 50%

Core Textbook

  • (2008), A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide), (4th Ed.), Project Management Institute
  • Lewis, J. P., (2007), Fundamentals of Project Management, (3rd), Amacom

Recommended Reading

  • Harvard Business Press, (2007), Harvard Business Review on Managing Projects, Harvard Business Press
  • Cobb, A. T., (2012), Leading Project Teams, Sage; London
  • Koster, K. ,(2010), International Project Management ,Sage; London
  • Journal of Project, Program and Portfolio Management (electronic resource)
  • International Journal of Project Management (electronic resource)

 

Journals

  • Harvard Business Review
  • Management Today
  • Journal of Management Studies
  • Newspaper
  • Financial Times

Recommended MOOCs and OERs

http://colfinder.net/materials/Learning_About_Small_Business.zip http://oldwebsite.col.org/resources/crsMaterials/Pages/SSBM.aspx http://oeru.org/oeru-partners/university-of-south-wales/developing-a-business-plan/ https://www.oercommons.org/authoring/6929-introduction-to-business-and-entrepreneurship/view http://www.oercommons.org/courses/monitoring-a-business/view

https://www.oercommons.org/courses/managing-your-business

https://www.oercommons.org/courses/project-management-2

https://www.edx.org/course/introduction-project-management-adelaidex-project101x

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/sloan-school-of-management/15-835-entrepreneurial-marketing-spring-2002/

https://learn.saylor.org/course/index.php?categoryid=6

Managing the Product Development Process

Unit Title: Managing the Product Development Process           Unit Code: BUSL70109

Level: 7                                              Credit Value: 20                    Guided Learning Hour: 200

Module Type: Optional

Objectives

  • To provide students with an understanding of the social, legal and economic constraints which affect the operation and management of a commercial enterprise.
  • To equip graduates with the knowledge, skills and expertise necessary to manage a successful product development process.
  • To provide graduates with the necessary reflective, self-critical skills which, together with skills learned in other modules of the Programme, will allow them to evolve into effective senior managers
  • Develop a critical understanding of the application of techniques applicable to the management concerns debates and issues in product development

Learning Outcome

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  1. Define and evaluate a management strategy appropriate for successful product development within the context of a given commercial enterprise;
  2. Make informed judgments and critically analyse alternative approaches based on strategic, financial and business considerations;
  3. Cohere and lead an interdisciplinary team to carry through product development within a given context leading to synthesising information and informed reflection.

Programme Indicative Content

  • Professional practice, Contemporary Management theory and practice,
  • Time management, Leadership and delegation.
  • Project management, Critical path analysis, and Milestone planning and resource allocation.
  • Business models, Concurrent engineering, Implementation strategies
  • Quality management,
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Building the business case, Product Liability.
  • Business ownership and liability, Consumer Protection Act

Evaluation Criteria

Assessment Method Duration / Type Weightage
Coursework 3000 words 50%
Written exam 2 hours 50%

Core Textbook

  • Trott, P., (2012), Innovation Management and New Product Development, Prentice Hall.
  • UWIC Online lecture support material

Recommended Reading

  • Cooper, R.G., (2001), Winning at New Products, Basic Books
  • Kelley, T., (2002), The Art of Innovation, Profile Business
  • Ulrich, K., and Eppinger, S., (2012), Product Design and Development, McGraw Hill.
  • Wright, I., (1998: 1), Design Methods In Engineering and Product Design, McGraw-Hill Company.

Recommended MOOCs and OERs

 

The Research Methods Module

This module provides a comprehensive introduction to research as practiced in business and management disciplines. It provides an overview of the key quantitative and qualitative methodologies required to undertake, evaluate and present a small scale research project, while helping students to build appropriate strategies for reviewing literature and developing a coherent set of aims and objectives for a research study. The module covers the major research methods (observation, surveys, case studies, interviews and action research), the implications of applying them, the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data and the presentation of findings. It identifies how to develop research questions/hypotheses and how to produce a robust and realistic research proposal and research design considering issues of data validation, triangulation and reliability.

The Dissertation

Building on the Research Methods module, students will produce an independent research project of approximately 10,000 -15,000 words in length. It is an intellectually challenging piece of individual management research which provides students with the opportunity to explore and produce an in-depth management study of particular interest to them.

Students are required to:

  • Critically evaluate major schools of thought within relevant management theory
  • Discriminate between research methods in order to make appropriate selections in conducting management and organisational research
  • Translate theory into practice through the study of its application in the real world Undertake empirical research in this area
  • Draw conclusions about the implications of the results for managerial decision-making
  • Despite being an independent research project, students are supported throughout the whole process by the team of dedicated Cardiff School of Management Supervisors. All students will be assigned a Personal Tutor who will provide regular feedback and advice on the student’s progress.